Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Warband based.

Since my last post I have painted the last two figures for my Warband elements plus four slingers. I have two chariots undercoated ready to start, fine little models one featuring a lovely animated figure of Boudica as we must call her now days, (I grew up knowing her as Boadicea from the statue on the London Embankment). Hinchliffe lists the chariots as EG 46 & EG 47, both feature different designs on the wicker side rails. I will need to add one more to make up the listed three chariot elements.

If I have one slight issue it's that the wire javelins keep falling off if I so much as touch them! I used 'Ultraloc' superglue, it may be that it's not the most efficient product, but Super it isn't! I have to re glue a few of them, which makes a mess of the hands requiring touching up, a bit of a pain in the proverbial.







I often watch/listen to related YouTube videos when painting, mostly documentaries, but found this clip from 'The Eagle' extremely watchable. The film as a whole is not great in my opinion, but this battle scene does represent the wild barbarian charge very well I think, and demonstrates the iron discipline of the Roman soldier, stabbing out from behind the large shield with the Gladius. Worth a quick watch for it's entertainment value.


10 comments:

  1. Fierce and great looking warbands, well done!

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  2. Scary looking warband - well done! Interesting point about Boad-i-cea which is the pronunciation I was taught at school (1960s). Not quite sure how these things change as nobody is alive today who met her to ask the correct way to say it. I blame Time team!

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    1. Hi Ian, I mentioned Boudica to my wife who said " Don't you mean Boadicea?" it's kind of ingrained for those of us of a certain generation as it's what we were taught at school!

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  3. Splendid looking host.

    I was never keen on wire spears for just that reason. My answer was, before priming, to epoxy them into place then gently squeeze the hand shut with needle nose pliers. A little hard on the little guys hand but better than facing the enemy empty handed.

    Eagle of the Ninth hss been a favourite book since I was a kid. I thought they handled the first part well but lost their way in the 2nd half, inventing a whole new but inferior story.

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    1. Thank you Ross :) I'm working on those wire spears now, trying to open up the hands a little more before closing them. I agree re Eagle of the Ninth, the film has a very odd ending.

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  4. Nice looking warband ,chariots look nice!
    Best Iain

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    1. Many thanks once again Iain, I seem to rattling through this project now that I have got over the Romans (AR1) with heads the size of giant pumpkins! Tough decision to ditch a dozen painted figures, but it will be worth it.

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  5. I removed the 'Anonymous' posting option as I was getting to such spam! Not sure what to do about that?

    Here is a comment from Rob sent via Matt (Wellington Man). Thanks for passing it on Matt :)

    Nice one. I usually get a hacksaw to deepen the slot in the hand before I glue in a spear and then I close it us with pliers and apply a bit more glue for solidity. All with super glue and they seem to last OK. I notice you kept the scythe blades on the chariots - I'll probably do the same for Boadicea but not for the others.
    I agree with you about the Eagle of the Ninth - I did buy a cheap copy to re-read after seeing the Eagle as I was certain they buried it at the and and it had lost its wings. As is often the case the film bears little resemblance to the book but the girlfriend and pet wolf were probably best left out. It's a shame Hollywood have to have individual heroic action - as the film is brilliant, even if not authentic, right up to the point where the very Roman looking chariot lands on him and it all goes black. If they could've kept on him AND his troops fighting an insurrection it'd probably be my favourite film (well second after the Draughtman's Contract).
    Rob

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    1. Cheers Rob - I have done a bit more prep on the Romans I'm working on, taking time to open up the hands slightly and using pliers as you suggest, it seems better. Your Roman Testudo is brilliant, love the hand painted shield designs. I must confess I lack knowledge of the period, this is really more of a retro project for me, I should do more research.I did notice the chariots in the Eagle scene were very Roman looking as you mention which kind of spoiled the impact somewhat.

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